2022 General Reading: November (+ Old Phuul update)

Completed reading for November:

  • The White People and Other Weird Stories (collection), by Arthur Machen
  • Not So Barren Or Uncultivated: British Travellers in Finland 1760-1830, by Tony Lurcock
  • J.R.R. Tolkien: A Biography, by Humphrey Carpenter
  • The Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead
  • Legends of Aotearoa (collection), edited by Sir George Grey
  • The Genealogy of Morals, by Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Vathek, by William Beckford
  • Folktales of the Maori (collection), edited by Alfred Grace
  • Moby-Dick, by Herman Melville
  • The Enchantress of Sylaire, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Demon of the Flower, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Devotee of Evil, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Disinterment of Venus, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Satyr (2 versions), by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Mandrakes, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Maker of Gargoyles, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The End of the Story, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Holiness of Azédarac, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Colossus of Ylourgne, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Planet of the Dead, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Plutonian Drug, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Light from Beyond, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Vaults of Yoh-Vombis, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The City of the Singing Flame, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Maze of Maal Dweb, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Chain of Aforgomon, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Dweller in the Gulf, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • Master of the Asteroid, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • Double Cosmos, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Supernumerary Corpse, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Stairs in the Crypt, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Dimension of Chance, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Dark Age, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • Phoenix, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Second Interment, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Uncharted Isle, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • Schizoid Creator, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Necromantic Tale, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • In the Book of Vergama (fragment), by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Great God Awto, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Bronze Image, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Emir’s Captive, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Letter from Mohaun Los, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • Thirteen Phantasms, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Epiphany of Death, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Fulfilled Prophecy, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Justice of the Elephant, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • Monsters in the Night, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Willow Landscape, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Raja and the Tiger, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Phantoms of the Fire, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • A Copy of Burns, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Venus of Azombeii, by Clark Ashton Smith
  • The Jewel in the Skull, by Michael Moorcock

The Book of the Dead is Faulkner’s translation of the Ani papyrus.

Smith’s City of the Singing Flame is the version where Beyond the Singing Flame is smooshed into it. For those keeping count, I have now completed a hundred Clark Ashton Smith stories (plus a fragment) in October and November. Apart from the forty-six from The Emperor of Dreams collection (October), I have been reading them off the Eldritch Dark (http://www.eldritchdark.com/writings/short-stories/).

Courtesy of a new laptop, which has made writing a much more pleasant experience, I have been doing substantial work on Old Phuul this month. Specifically, the manuscript currently sits at 75,160 words. The 14,000 or so words added in November constitute the result of a full rewrite from the start. Editing traditionally deletes unnecessary words, and I do indeed do that, but I am a chronic underwriter on drafts, and often find myself needing to add material to properly polish it. So once one takes into account the deletions, I have written substantially more than 14,000 words on the work this month.

The other thing this means is that Rhea’s story will need to continue into a further book. My intent for Old Phuul is for it to be in the 90,000-100,000 word range. So I am indeed coming to the end of Old Phuul, and need an appropriate cut-off point for a continuation, rather than a self-contained climax like Wise Phuul. Nor is this a first draft as such – those existing words have been rewritten many times, and hopefully I will be able to submit the Old Phuul manuscript to the publisher fairly early in the New Year.

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